HOME
Archive
Photos
Facts
News
Chronology AotC
Battles & Reports
Overview
Links
.
Reports of the battle for Chattanooga 23-25 Nov. 63

1. George H. Thomas
2. Ulysses S. Grant
3. Joseph Hooker
4. William T. Sherman
5. Peter J. Osterhaus
6. August Willich
7. Henry W. Halleck
------------
8. Braxton Bragg
9. Patrick R. Cleburne
10. Alexander P. Stewart  ?



1. George H. Thomas
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOL. XXXI/2 [S# 55] NOV. 23-27, 1863.--The Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign. No. 9.--Reports of Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, U. S. Army, commanding Army of the Cumberland, including operations Oct. 31-Dec. 31, and field dispatches, etc., Nov. 22-29.

[ar55_90 con't]
CHATTANOOGA, TENN., November 24, 1863--12 m.
(Received 3.45 a.m., 25th.)
Yesterday at 12.30 o'clock Granger's and Palmer's corps, supported by Howard's, were advanced directly in front of our fortifications, drove in the enemy's pickets, and carried his first line of rifle-pits, between Chattanooga and Citico Creeks. We captured 9 commissioned officers and about 160 enlisted men. Our loss about 111. Today Hooker, in command of Geary's division, Twelfth Corps, Osterhaus' division, Fifteenth Corps, and two brigades, Fourth Corps, carried the north slope of Lookout Mountain, with small loss on our :side, and a loss to the enemy of 500 or 600 prisoners. Killed and wounded not reported. There has been continuous infantry fighting from 12 o'clock until after night, but our troops gallantly repulsed every attempt to retake the position. Sherman crossed the Tennessee before daylight this morning, at the mouth of South Chickamauga, with three divisions of the Fifteenth Corps and one division of the Fourteenth Corps, and carried the northern extremity of Missionary Ridge. General Grant has ordered a general advance in the morning. Our success so far has been complete, and the behavior of the troops admirable.
 GEO. H. THOMAS, Major-General.
 Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief.
-----
CHATTANOOGA, TENN., November 25, 1863--12 p.m.
(Received 3.15 a.m., 26th.)
The operations of to-day have been more successful than yesterday, having carried Missionary Ridge, from near Rossville to the railroad tunnel, with a comparatively small loss on our side, capturing about forty pieces of artillery, a large quantity of small-arms, camp and garrison equipage, besides the arms in the hands of the prisoners. We captured 2,000 prisoners, of whom 200 were officers, of all grades, from colonels down. Will pursue the enemy in the morning. The <ar55_91> conduct of the officers and troops was everything that could be expected. Missionary Ridge was carried simultaneously at six different points.
 GEO. H. THOMAS, Major-General.
 Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief.
-----
CHATTANOOGA, TENN., November 26, 1863--11 p.m.
(Received 3.20 a.m., 27th.)
General Davis, commanding a division of the Fourteenth Corps, operating with General Sherman, gained possession of the Chickamauga Depot at 12.30 o'clock to-day. My troops, having pursued by the Rossville and Graysville road, came upon the enemy's cavalry at New Bridge, posted on the east side of the creek. They retired on the approach of our troops. The column will be detained for a few hours, to rebuild the bridge, but Hooker thinks he can reach Graysville, and, perhaps, Ringgold, to-night. Many stragglers have been picked up to-day--perhaps 2,000. Among the prisoners are many who were paroled at Vicksburg. What shall I do with them?
 GEO. H. THOMAS, Major-General.
 Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief.
-----
CHATTANOOGA, TENN., November 27, 1863--12 p.m.
(Received 4.50 p.m., 28th.)
General Palmer reports that Johnson's division, Fourteenth Corps, surprised A. P. Stewart's division last night, taking four guns, two caissons, and many prisoners. Hooker reports his arrival at Ringgold at 9 a.m. to-day. Found the road strewn with caissons, limbers, and ambulances, and he commenced skirmishing with the enemy at 11 a.m. in the railroad pass or gap, near Ringgold. About half of Osterhaus' and third of Geary's divisions engaged and forced the enemy to abandon the position he had taken in the passes. Both divisions suffered severely, the enemy making obstinate resistance.
On the morning of the 24th, I sent Colonel Long, commanding Second Brigade, Second Cavalry Division, across South Chickamauga, to make raids on the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad. He returned this evening, bringing 250 prisoners, and reports that he destroyed the railroad from Tyner's Station to the Hiwassee and 10 miles southwest of Cleveland. He also destroyed 80 wagons, large quantities of commissary stores, and other supplies at Cleveland. He attempted to destroy the pontoon across the Hiwassee, but found it too strongly guarded for his force.
By direction of General Grant, I will send General Gordon Granger early to-morrow up the Tennessee, to harass Longstreet as much as possible, and draw him away from Knoxville. The prisoners we nave taken since the 23d now sum up more than 5,000. I have three steam-boats running between Bridgeport and this place. As soon as <ar55_92> repairs on the railroad are complete we shall again be in good condition. Have been greatly embarrassed by the condition of the means of transportation and the lines of communication.
 GEO. H. THOMAS, Major-General, Commanding.
 Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Chattanooga, December 1, 1863.
GENERAL: The following operations of the Army of the Cumberland since October 31 are respectfully submitted to the General-in-Chief:
As soon as communications with Bridgeport had been made secure, and the question of supplying the army at this point rendered certain, preparations were at once commenced for driving the enemy from his position in our immediate front on Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, and, if possible, to send a force to the relief of Knoxville. To enable me to dislodge the enemy from the threatening position he had assumed in our front guns of a heavier caliber than those with the army were needed, also additional means for crossing the Tennessee River. Brigadier-General Brannan, chief of artillery, was directed to send for the necessary number of guns and ammunition, and after consulting with Brig. Gen. W. F. Smith, chief engineer, to prepare the batteries for the guns on their arrival. While awaiting the arrival of the guns and ammunition, work was prosecuted on the fortifications around the town. In addition to his duties of superintending the work on the fortifications, General Smith pushed vigorously the construction of two pontoon bridges, to be used in the execution of the movements which were determined upon as necessary to a successful dislodgment of the enemy.
Guerrillas having become somewhat troublesome to the northeast of McMinnville and east of the Caney Fork of the Cumberland, Brigadier-General Elliott, chief of cavalry, was ordered, November 14, to establish his headquarters with the First Division of Cavalry at or near Alexandria, and employ the division in hunting up and exterminating these marauders. Elliott reached Alexandria on the 18th, and on the 27th reports that his scouts met those of Burnside on Flint Ridge, east of Sparta, and that Lieutenant-Colonel Brownlow, with detachments from the First East Tennessee and Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry, attacked the rebel Colonel Murray on the 26th at Sparta, killing 1, wounding 2, and capturing 10 of the enemy, including a lieutenant of Champ. Ferguson's; he also captured a few horses and some ammunition, and destroyed extensive salt-works used by the rebels. A company of scouts, under Captain Brixey, also encountered a party of guerrillas near Beersheba Springs, capturing 15 or 20, and dispersing the rest.
Brig. Gen. R. S. Granger reports from Nashville, November 2, that--
A mixed command, under Lieutenant-Colonel Scully, First Middle Tennessee Infantry, sent out from Nashville, attacked and defeated Hawkins and other guerrilla chiefs, and pursued them to Centreville, Hickman County, where Hawkins made another stand, attacking our forces while crossing the river. Hawkins was again routed, and pursued until his forces dispersed. Rebel loss from 15 to 20 killed and 6 prisoners; our loss 1 severely and several slightly wounded. <ar55_93>
Again, on November 4, that--
Major Fitz Gibbon, Fourteenth Michigan Infantry, came upon the combined forces of Cooper, Kirk, Williams, and Scott (guerrillas), at Lawrenceburg, 85 miles from Columbia, and after a severe hand-to-hand fight defeated them, killing 8, wounding 7, and capturing 24 prisoners: among the latter, 1 captain and 2 lieutenants. Major Fitz Gibbon's loss, 3 men slightly wounded and 8 horses killed. He reports the enemy 400 strong, and his force 120.
November 13:
Captain Cutler, with one company of mounted infantry and a portion of Whittemore's battery (mounted), belonging to the garrison of Clarksville, had a fight near Palmyra with Captain Grey's company of guerrillas, killing 2, wounding 5, and taking 1 prisoner; Cutler's loss, 1 lieutenant and 1 man wounded.
November 16:
Scout organized by Brigadier-General Paine, and sent out from Gallatin and La Vergne, returned, and report having killed 5 and captured 26 guerrillas, with horses, sheep, cattle, and hogs in their possession, collected for the use of the rebel army.
Brigadier-General Crook, commanding Second Division of Cavalry, was ordered, November 17, to concentrate his division at or near Huntsville, Ala., and to patrol the north side of the Tennessee from Decatur to Bridgeport, and to hunt up bands of guerrillas reported to be roaming about in that region, arresting and robbing Union citizens. General Crook reports on the 21st that an expedition sent down the Tennessee had destroyed nine boats between Whitesburg and Decatur, some of them 60 feet long. The expedition crossed the river and drove off the rebels, taking their boats. From the best information to be obtained, there were two small regiments of cavalry and one battery on the other side, doing picket duty. Lee and Roddey reported as having gone to Mississippi. Major-General Sherman, commanding Army of the Tennessee, having been ordered with the Fifteenth Corps to this point to participate in the operations against the enemy, reached Bridgeport with two divisions on the 15th. He came to the front himself, and having examined the ground, expressed himself confident of his ability to execute his share of the work. The plan of operations was then written out substantially as follows: Sherman, with the Fifteenth Corps, strengthened with one division from my command, was to effect a crossing of the Tennessee River just below the mouth of the South Chickamauga, on Saturday, November 21, at daylight: his crossing to be protected by artillery planted on the heights on the north bank of the river. After crossing his force, he was to carry the heights of Missionary Ridge from their northern extremity to about the railroad tunnel before the enemy could concentrate a force against him. I was to co-operate with Sherman by concentrating my troops in Chattanooga Valley, on my left flank, leaving only the necessary force to defend the fortifications on the right and center, with a movable column of one division in readiness to move wherever ordered. This division was to show itself as threateningly as possible on the most practicable line for making an attack up the valley. I was then to effect a junction with Sherman, making my advance from the left, well toward the north end of Mission Ridge, and moving as near simultaneously with Sherman as possible. The junction once formed and the Ridge carried, communications would be at once established between the two armies by roads running on the south bank of the river. Further movements to depend on those of the enemy. Lookout Valley was to be held by Geary's division of the Twelfth Corps, and the two <ar55_94> brigades of the Fourth Corps ordered to co-operate with him; the whole under command of Major-General Hooker. Howard's corps was to be held in readiness to act either with my troops at Chattanooga or with General Sherman's, and was ordered to take up a position on Friday night on the north side of the Tennessee near the first pontoon bridge, and there held in readiness for such orders as might become necessary. General Smith commenced at once to collect his pontoons and materials for bridges in the North Chickamauga Creek, preparatory to the crossing of Sherman's troops, proper precautions being taken that the enemy should not discover the movement. General Sherman then returned to Bridgeport to direct the movements of his troops. Colonel Long (Fourth Ohio Cavalry), commanding Second Brigade, Second Division Cavalry, was ordered on the 16th to report at Chattanooga on Saturday, the 21st, by noon; the intention being for him to follow up the left flank of Sherman's troops, and if not required by General Sherman, he was to cross the Chickamauga, make a raid upon the enemy's communications, and do as much damage as possible. Owing to a heavy rain-storm, commencing on Friday (20th), and lasting all of the 21st, General Sherman was not enabled to get his troops in position in time to commence operations on Saturday morning, as he expected.
Learning that the enemy had discovered Sherman's movements across Lookout Valley, it was thought best that General Howard should cross over into Chattanooga, thus attracting the attention of the enemy, with the intention of leading him to suppose that those troops he had observed moving were re-enforcing Chattanooga, and thereby concealing the real movements of Sherman. Accordingly, Howard's corps was crossed into Chattanooga on Sunday, and took up a position in full view of the enemy. In consequence of the bad condition of the roads General Sherman's troops were occupied all of Sunday in getting into position. In the meantime, the river having risen, both pontoon bridges were broken by rafts sent down the river by the enemy, cutting off Osterhaus' division from the balance of Sherman's troops. It was thought this would delay us another day, but during the night of the 22d, two deserters reported Bragg had fallen back, and that there was only a strong picket line in our front. Early on the morning of the 23d, I received a note from Major-General Grant, directing me to ascertain by a demonstration the truth or falsity of this report.
Orders were accordingly given to General Granger, commanding the Fourth Corps, to form his troops and to advance directly in front of Fort Wood, and thus develop the strength of the enemy.  General Palmer, commanding the Fourteenth Corps, was directed to support General Granger's right, with Baird's division refused and en echelon. Johnson's division, Fourteenth Corps, to be held in readiness, under arms, in the intrenchments, to re-enforce at any point. Howard's corps was formed en masse behind the center of Granger's corps. The two divisions of Granger's corps (Sheridan's and Wood's) were formed in front of Fort Wood; Sheridan on the right, Wood on the left, with his left extending nearly to Citico Creek. The formation being completed about 2 p.m. the troops were advanced steadily and with rapidity directly to the front, driving before them first the rebel pickets, then their reserves, and falling upon their grand guards stationed in their first line of rifle-pits, captured something over 200 men, and secured themselves in their new positions before the enemy had sufficiently recovered from his surprise to attempt to send re-enforcements <ar55_95> from his main camp. Orders were then given to General Granger to make his position secure by constructing temporary breastworks and throwing out strong pickets to his front. Howard's corps was moved up on the left of Granger, with the same instructions, and Bridges' (Illinois) battery was placed in position on Orchard Knob. The troops remained in that position for the night. The Tennessee River having risen considerably from the effect of the previous heavy rain-storm, it was found difficult to rebuild the pontoon bridge at Brown's Ferry. Therefore it was determined that General Hooker should take Osterhaus' division, which was still in Lookout Valley, and Geary's division, Whitaker's and Grose's brigades, of the First Division, Fourth Corps, under Brigadier-General Cruft, and make a strong demonstration on the western slope of Lookout Mountain, for the purpose of attracting the enemy's attention in that direction and thus withdrawing him from Sherman while crossing the river at the mouth of the South Chickamauga.
General Hooker was instructed that in making this demonstration, if he discovered the position and strength of the enemy would justify him in attempting to carry the point of the mountain, to do so. By 4 a.m. on the morning of the 24th, General Hooker reported his troops in position and ready to advance.
Finding Lookout Creek so much swollen as to be impassable, he sent Geary's division, supported by Cruft's two brigades, to cross the creek at Wauhatchie, and work down on the right bank, while he employed the remainder of his force in constructing temporary bridges across the creek on the main road. The enemy, being attracted by the force on the road, did not observe the movements of Geary until his column was directly on their left and threatened their rear. Hooker's movements were facilitated by the heavy mist which overhung the mountain, enabling Geary to get into position without attracting attention.
Finding himself vigorously pushed by a strong column on his left and rear, the enemy began to fall back with rapidity, but his resistance was obstinate, and the entire point of the mountain was not gained until about 2 p.m., when General Hooker reported by telegraph that he had carried the mountain as far as the road from Chattanooga Valley to the white house. Soon after his main column,  coming up, his line was extended to the foot of the mountain, near the mouth of Chattanooga Creek. His right, being still strongly resisted by the enemy, was re-enforced by Carlin's brigade, First Division, Fourteenth Corps, which arrived at the white house about 5 p.m., in time to take part in the contest still going on at that point. Continuous and heavy skirmishing was kept up in Hooker's front until 10 at night, after which there was an unusual quietness along our whole front.
With the aid of the steamer Dunbar, which had been put in condition and sent up the river at daylight of the 24th, General Sherman by 11 a.m. had crossed three divisions of the Fifteenth Corps, and was ready to advance as soon as Davis' division of the Fourteenth Corps commenced crossing. Colonel Long (Fourth Ohio Cavalry), commanding Second Brigade. Second Division Cavalry, was then ordered to move up at once, follow Sherman's advance closely, and to proceed to carry out his instructions of the day before, if not required by General Sherman to support his left flank.
Howard's corps moved to the left about 9 a.m., and communicated with Sherman about noon. Instructions were sent to General Hooker <ar55_96> to be ready to advance on the morning of the 25th from his position on the point of Lookout Mountain to the Summertown road, and endeavor to intercept the enemy's retreat, if he had not already withdrawn, which he was to ascertain by pushing a reconnaissance to the top of Lookout Mountain.
The reconnaissance was made as directed, and having ascertained that the enemy had evacuated during the night, General Hooker was then directed to move on the Rossville road with the troops under his command (except Carlin's brigade, which was to rejoin its division), carry the pass at Rossville, and operate upon the enemy's left and rear. Palmer's and Granger's troops were held in readiness to advance directly on the rifle-pits in their front as soon as Hooker could get into position at Rossville. In retiring on the night of the 24th, the enemy had destroyed the bridges over Chattanooga Creek on the road leading from Lookout Mountain to Rossville, and, in consequence, General Hooker was delayed until after 2 p.m. in effecting the crossing of the creek. About noon, General Sherman becoming heavily engaged by the enemy, they having massed a strong force in his front, orders were given for General Baird to march his division within supporting distance of General Sherman. Moving his command promptly in the direction indicated, he was placed in position to the left of Wood's division of Granger's corps.
Owing to the difficulties of the ground, his troops did not get in line with Granger's until about 2.30 p.m. Orders were then given him, however, to move forward on Granger's left, and within supporting distance, against the enemy's rifle-pits on the slope and at the foot of Missionary Ridge. The whole line then advanced against the breastworks, and soon became warmly engaged with the enemy's skirmishers; these, giving way, retired upon their reserves, posted within their works. Our troops advancing steadily in a continuous line, the enemy, seized with panic, abandoned the works at the foot of the hill and retreated precipitately to the crest, where they were closely followed by our troops, who, apparently inspired by the impulse of victory, carried the hill simultaneously at six different points, and so closely upon the heels of the enemy that many of them were taken prisoners in the trenches. We captured all their cannon and ammunition before they could be removed or destroyed.
After halting for a few moments to reorganize the troops, who had Become somewhat scattered in the assault of the hill, General Sheridan pushed forward in pursuit, and drove those in his front who escaped capture across Chickamauga Creek. Generals Wood and Baird, being obstinately resisted by re-enforcements from the enemy's extreme right, continued fighting until darkness set in, slowly but steadily driving the enemy before them. In moving upon Rossville, General Hooker encountered Stewart's division and other troops. Finding his left flank threatened, Stewart attempted to escape by retreating toward Graysville, but some of his force, finding their retreat threatened from that quarter, retired in disorder toward their right, along the crest of the ridge, when they were met by another portion of General Hooker's command, and were driven by these troops in the face of Johnson's division of Palmer's corps, by whom they were nearly all made prisoners.
It will be perceived from the above report that the original plan of operations was somewhat modified to meet and take the best advantage of emergencies, which necessitated material modifications of that plan [boldface mine]. It is believed, however, that the original plan, had it been <ar55_97> carried out, could not possibly have led to more successful results. The alacrity displayed by officers in executing their orders, the enthusiasm and spirit displayed by the men who did the work, cannot be too highly appreciated by the nation, for the defense of which they have on so many other memorable occasions nobly and patriotically exposed their lives in battle. Howard's corps (Eleventh) having joined Sherman on the 24th, his operations from that date will be included in Sherman's report; also those of Brig. Gen. J. C. Davis division, of the Fourteenth Corps, who reported for duty to General Sherman on the 21st. General Granger's command returned to Chattanooga, with instructions to prepare and hold themselves in readiness for orders to re-enforce General Burnside at Knoxville. On the 26th, the enemy were pursued by Hooker's and Palmer's commands, surprising a portion of their rear guard near Graysville after nightfall, capturing three pieces of artillery and several hundred prisoners. The pursuit was continued on the 27th, capturing an additional piece of artillery at Graysville. Hooker's advance encountered the enemy posted in the pass through Taylor's Ridge, who, after an obstinate resistance of an hour, were driven from the pass with considerable loss in killed, wounded, and prisoners. Our loss was also heavy. A large quantity of forage and some additional caissons and ammunition were captured at Ringgold. On the 28th, Colonel Long (Fourth Ohio Cavalry) returned to Chattanooga from his expedition, and reported verbally that on the 24th he reached Tyner's Station, destroying the enemy's forage and rations at that place, also some cars, and doing considerable injury to the railroad. He then proceeded to Ooltewah, where he captured and destroyed some trains loaded with forage. From thence he proceeded to Cleveland, remaining there one day, destroyed their cop-per-rolling mill and a large depot of commissary and ordnance stores. Being informed that a train of the enemy's wagons was near Charleston, on the Hiwassee, and was probably unable to cross the river on account of the break in their pontoon bridge, after a few hours rest he pushed forward with a hope of being able to destroy them, but found, on reaching Charleston, that the enemy had repaired their bridge and had crossed their trains safely, and were prepared to defend the crossing with one or two pieces of artillery, supported by an infantry force on the north bank. He then returned to Cleveland and damaged the railroad for 5 or 6 miles in the direction of Dalton, and then returned to Chattanooga.
On the 28th, General Hooker was ordered by General Grant to remain at Ringgold until the 30th, and so employ his troops as to cover the movements of General Sherman, who had received orders to march his force to the relief of Burnside by way of Cleveland and Loudon. Palmer's corps was detached from the force under General Hooker and returned to Chattanooga.
I have the honor to annex hereto consolidated returns of prisoners, captured property, and casualties.
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 GEO. H. THOMAS, Major-General, U. S. Vols., Commanding.
 Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army.
 «7 R R--VOL XXXI, PT II» <ar55_98>
[Inclosure No 1.]
Report of Casualties, Department of the Cumberland, during the battle of Chattanooga, November, 1863.
O Officers. T Total Men. A Aggregate

 FOURTH ARMY CORPS - Major General GRANGER
                                                                        ----Killed---- ---Wounded---- ---Missing---
Command O M T O M T O M T A
First.Division,.Major-General.Stanley 1 18 19 5 80 85 .... .... .... 104
Second.Division,.Major-General.Sheridan 12 123 135 105 1,046 1,151 .... .... .... 1,286
Third.Division,.Brigadier-General.Wood 14 136 150 59 792 851 .... .... .... 1,001
Total 27 277 304 169 1,918 2,087 .... .... .... (a)2,391

FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS.(b) Major-General PALMER.
First.Division,.Brigadier-General.Johnson.(c) .... .... 46 .... .... 258 .... .... .... 304
Second.Division,.Brigadier-General.Davis .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... (d)
Third.Division,.Brigadier-General.Baird. .... .... 97 .... .... 461 .... .... 7 565
Total .... .... 143 .... .... 719 .... .... 7 869

ELEVENTH ARMY CORPS - Major-General HOWARD.
Second.Division,.Brigadier-General.von.Steinwehr 3 22 25 14 162 176 8 116 124 325
Third.Division,.Major-General.Schurz. .... 1 1 1 13 14 .... 10 10 25
Total 3 23 26 15 175 190 8 126 134 350

TWELFTH ARMY CORPS - Major-General SLOCUM.
First.Division,.Brigadier-General.Williams.(e) .... .... .... .... ........ .... .... .... ....
Second.Division,.Brigadier-General.Geary 7 49 56 33 252 285 .... 44 345
Total  7 49 56 33 252 285 .... 4 4 345
Grand.total(*)  37 349 529 217 2,345 3,281 8 130 145 3,955

At least 225 rebels killed.
 

[Inclosure No. 2.]
The following is a copy of a telegram just received from Major-General Granger at Knoxville. The list of casualties in the Fourth Army Corps on the previous page [above] is compiled from the statements <ar55_99> of staff officers at this place; the discrepancy cannot be explained until General Granger's report is received.
STRAWBERRY PLAINS, VIA CALHOUN, TENN., January 16, 1864.
 General GEORGE H. THOMAS,
Chattanooga, Tenn.:
Lost in Sheridan's and Wood's divisions, 2,544 men; in Stanley's, about 200.
 G. GRANGER, Major-General.
[Inclosure No. 3.]
Report of rebel deserters and prisoners of war received and captured October 20-December 1, 1863.

O Officers. T Total. M Men. A Aggregate.
                                 ---October.---- -----November.------ ---Total.----
Command O M T O M T O M A
Deserters 1 40 41 2 530 532 3 570 573
Prisoners.of.war  6 92 98 230 5,241 5,471 236 5,333 5,569
Total  7 132 139 232 5,771 6,003 239 5,903 6,142

[lnclosure No. 4.]
ORDNANCE OFFICE, HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, Tenn., January 16, 1864.
 Brig. Gen. WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dept. of the Cumberland:
SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a list of all ordnance and ordnance stores captured from the enemy, together with a list of expenditures and losses by our own troops, in the recent battle of Chattanooga:
Captured from the enemy.
FIELD GUNS AND HOWITZERS.
Smooth-bores:
6-pounder guns, 3.67-inch bore  8
12-pounder light guns, Confederate pattern, 4.62-inch bore  13
12-pounder light guns, model 1857, Leeds & Co., New Orleans  6
12-pounder field howitzers, 4.62-inch bore  3
Total smooth-bores  30

Rifled guns:
3-inch, Confederate pattern  1
10-pounder Parrott gun, model 1861, 2.9-inch bore  4
6-pounder field, 3.67-inch bore  2
6-pounder James, 3.80-inch bore  1
Total rifled guns  8

Siege, garrison, and sea coast guns: 24-pounder guns, 5.82-inch bore  2
Total pieces captured  40
 <ar55_100>
ARTILLERY CARRIAGES.
Field carriages:
For field 12-pounder gun  13
For l2-pounder field guns (no limbers)  6
For 6-pounder field guns  5
For 6-pounder field guns (no limbers)  3
For 12-pounder field howitzers (no limbers)  3
For 10-pounder rifled guns  3
For 10-pounder rifled guns (no limbers)  1
For 6-pounder rifled guns (no limbers)  3
For 3-inch rifled guns  1

Caissons:
For 12-pounder light guns  18
For 12-pounder field howitzers  2
For 10-pounder rifled guns  3
For 6-pounder rifled guns  2
For 3-inch rifled guns  1

Battery wagons  4
Traveling forges  1
Artillery harness: A good many parts of harness were also captured, but no complete sets.
ARTILLERY AMMUNITION.
 Rounds.
For light 12-pounder gun  1,137
For 12-pounder field howitzer  320
For 6-pounder field gun  347
For 10-pounder rifled gun  324
For 3-inch rifled gun  57
For 3.8-inch rifled gun  151
MISCELLANEOUS.
  Rounds.
Small-arms:
Stand of small-arms, mostly Enfield   6,175
Cavalry sabers   28
Infantry accouterments:
Bayonet scabbards   547
Cap pouches   511
Cartridge boxes   1,911
Cartridge-box plates   439
Cartridge-box belts   149
Waist belts   165
Waist-belt plates   149
Infantry ammunition  rounds 55,000
Expended and lost by our own troops.
Small-arms  stand 211
Infantry accouterments  sets.. 171
Artillery ammunition  rounds 1,977
Infantry ammunition  do  1,460,125

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 T. G. BAYLOR, Captain, and Chief of Ordnance, Dept. of the Cumberland.
ADDENDA.
SOUTH CHICKAMAUGA SIGNAL STATION, November 22, 1863.
 Captain MERRILL, Chief Signal Officer, Dept. of the Cumberland:
CAPTAIN: A heavy body of troops are moving in direction of our left on crest of Missionary Ridge. One portion of them are northeast <ar55_101> of the tunnel on the crest of the ridge, their train being directly above the tunnel. Another portion of them are on the crest of the ridge and side, also near the farthest log fortifications on their right. I think they are moving down the east side of Missionary Ridge.
 DE MOTTE, Lieutenant, and Acting Signal Officer.
-----
SIGNAL STATION OPPOSITE SOUTH CHICKAMAUGA, November 22, 1863--10 a.m.
 Captain MERRILL:
Column of infantry--at least one division--moving to our left from rebel center along the base of Missionary Ridge.
 QUINTON, Lieutenant, and Acting Signal Officer.
-----
MOCCASIN POINT SIGNAL STATION, November 22, 1863. (Received 11.55 a.m.)
 Captain LEONARD:
Can see artillery and long train of wagons going up the road on Mission Ridge, eight degrees east of south from this station.
 WOOD, Captain, and Acting Signal Officer.
-----
BALD MOUNTAIN SIGNAL STATION, November 22, 1863--4 p.m.
 Captain MERRILL, Chief Signal Officer :
The enemy are stirring; moving toward our right.
 QUINTON, Lieutenant, and Acting Signal Officer.
-----
HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS, Caldwell's Ferry, Tenn., November 22, 1863.
 Major-General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff:
GENERAL: A few moments after the first guns of artillery were fired at Chattanooga this morning, the enemy's infantry was discovered moving rapidly up the hill a little below and opposite this point. A column of a brigade has passed since first discovered. The column is still moving on. They seem to be moving for action. No wagons are to be seen with it.
I send this by my medical director, Surgeon Payne, who can give particulars.
Very respectfully,
JEF. C. DAVIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.
P. S.--Since writing the above the column is seen going up the river, and a large train is also seen moving up the river some distance above this point.
 <ar55_102>
 NOVEMBER 22, 1863-1.50 p.m.
 Major-General THOMAS:
All the enemy's camps upon his right look like they are deserted. The troops are evidently out of them for some purpose or other.
 JEF. C. DAVIS, Brigadier-General.
-----
SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS No. 313.
HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, Tenn., Nov. 22, 1863.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
II. In accordance with Special Field Orders, No. 272 (current series), from these headquarters, Brig. Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, commanding Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, is hereby detailed as general officer of the day for to-morrow, November 23, 1863. He will report at these headquarters at 8 a.m. to-morrow for instructions.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
By command of Major-General Thomas:
 WILLIAM McMICHAEL, Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, November 23, 1863.
 Lieutenant QUINTON:
General Thomas wants to know whether in your dispatch of yesterday the rebels were moving toward our right or toward Rossville. You must be more particular.
 JESSE MERRILL, Captain, and Acting Signal Officer.
-----
STATION OPPOSITE SOUTH CHICKAMAUGA, November 23, 1863. (Received 10 a.m.)
 Captain MERRILL:
They were moving toward Rossville; came out of their camps by company, formed on their color line, and moved off by regiments. I counted ten regiments.
 QUINTON, Lieutenant, Acting Signal Officer.
-----
 NOVEMBER 23, 1863.
 General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff:
I send you the following rebel message. It is not quite complete:
11 p.m.
HARDEE:
Enemy all north of east. Troops were massed from left to center. Those on the right moved to center. South from Raccoon, on mountain, were in line in full sight, east. If they intend to attack, I think it will be on our left. Bridges gone.
C. L. STEVENSON.
Respectfully submitted.
 JESSE MERRILL, Captain, and Chief Signal Officer.
 <ar55_103>
 NOVEMBER 23, 1863.
 Major-General REYNOLDS,
Chief of Staff:
GENERAL: I send two more rebel messages, the first one taken from Lookout and the other from Missionary Ridge :(*)
HARDEE:
I observed from this point the movements of the enemy until --. The object seemed to be to attract our attention. The troops in sight were formed from center to left. Those on the right moved to center. Troops from Raccoon were in line in full sight. If they intend to attack my opinion is it will be upon our left. Both of their bridges are gone.
S[TEVENSON],
General.
On whose left did General S. think your attack would be made? Respectfully submitted.
 JESSE MERRILL, Captain, and Chief Signal Officer.
-----
ORCHARD KNOB, November 23, 1863--3 p.m.
 General THOMAS:
The enemy's rifle-pits in front, 1,200 yards, very strong and filled with rebels. They cannot be carried without heavy loss.
 G. GRANGER, Major-General.
-----
 NOVEMBER 23, 1863--4.15 p.m.
 General THOMAS:
Heavy columns are passing to our left to the front of Howard. They have double lines of rifle-pits in his front.
 G. GRANGER, Major-General.
-----
CHATTANOOGA, November 23, 1863--6.40 p.m.
 Brig. Gen. WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Assistant Adjutant-General:
GENERAL: An order has just been handed me directed to Brigadier-General Baird, directing him to "close to the left on Sheridan." Is it intended that he shall advance so as to connect with Sheridan's line?
 JOHN M. PALMER, Major-general, Commanding.
-----
DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, November 23, 1863--6.30 p.m.
 Major-General PALMER, Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:
The general commanding directs that General Baird's troops move to the left and connect with General Sheridan. The troops need not <ar55_104> move farther to the front than is necessary to connect, and only those on the extreme left.
By command of Major-General Thomas:
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-general. and Chief of Staff.
-----
 NOVEMBER 23, 1863.
 General GRANGER:
Hold and strengthen your position. General Howard's corps is taking position on your left.
By order of Major-General Thomas:
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, Chief of Staff.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, November 23, 1863.
 Major-General GRANGER, Commanding Fourth Army Corps:
The general commanding department directs that you throw one division of the Fourth Corps forward in the direction of Orchard Knob, and hold a second division in supporting distance, to disclose the position of the enemy, if he still remain in the vicinity of his old camp. Howard's and Baird's commands will be ready to co-operate if needed.
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, Chief of Staff.
[Indorsement.]
HEADQUARTERS FOURTH ARMY CORPS, November 23, 1863.
Brigadier-General Wood, with his division, will, as soon as possible, carry out the foregoing instructions, and he will be supported by General Sheridan's division, to be posted along near the line of railroad, its right resting about midway between Moore's road and the Brush Knob, in front of Lunette Palmer.
 G. GRANGER, Major-General.
-----
 NOVEMBER 23, 1863--9 p.m.
 Major-General THOMAS, Commanding:
GENERAL: They signaled from Lookout Mountain that both our pontoons were broken. This was only the latter portion of the message; all that could be caught. All quiet except a few shots on Sheridan's right. From the exclamations, I think probably some deserters coming in.
Respectfully,
 J. C. McKIBBIN, Colonel.
 <ar55_105>
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, November 20, 1863--10 p.m.
GENERAL: Nothing of importance except heavy camp fires in Chattanooga Valley, extending clear back to the Nickajack road, as if troops had come down the mountain.
The following was signaled from Lookout Mountain:
Maj. D. H POOLE:
What is the position of things on the right
JACKSON.
 J. C. McKIBBIN, Colonel.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, November 23, 1863--10 p.m.
 Major-General HOOKER,
Lookout Valley:
If Woods' division does not get across the river by daybreak, he is ordered to report to you, and in that event the general commanding department directs that you endeavor to take the point of Lookout Mountain.
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, Chief of Staff.
-----
HDQRS. 14TH ARMY CORPS, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, November 23, 1863--10.50 p.m.
 Maj. Gen. JOSEPH J. REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland:
GENERAL: The firing heard when I left headquarters was only a few shots on Baird's front. Baird informed me that before receiving the order to close to the left on Sheridan, he was in that position. After leaving him I rode around the line of pickets on my front. The officer in command of the advance post immediately to right of Rossville road reports the movement of wagons on his front, but could give no information as to the direction they were moving. He said, "They are massing troops on our front; I heard distinctly the order, 'close in mass.'" The officer in command of a detachment of the Sixteenth and Nineteenth Regulars reports the felling of trees by the enemy near the base of Lookout Mountain. From the direction he pointed in giving the information, they may be blocking the road around the point of the mountain.
Very respectfully,
 JOHN M. PALMER, Major-General, Commanding'.
-----
HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., SECOND DIV., 14TH ARMY CORPS, North Chickamauga Creek, Tenn., November 23, 1863.
 Major-General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff:
SIR: I have the honor to report that a rebel picket, on the opposite side of the river, called across to one of my pickets, and asked <ar55_106> when we would be ready to move our pontoon-boats out of the creek. And also said, "You Yankees think you will take us by surprise." From this it seems that the rebels have become acquainted with our movements; this is nothing more than I anticipated, for on last Tuesday, before I myself was fully advised of the plan, and before a single pontoon had reached this point, and even before the road was cut to convey them hither, a citizen fully detailed the plan to one of my captains, stationed at Moccasin Gap. On the morning the pontoons left Chattanooga, at least 20 citizens were allowed to pass them unmolested and unarrested, before the pontoons had left the Poe road to come to this point.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 DANL. McCOOK.
-----
SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS No. 314.
HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, Tenn., Nov. 23, 1863.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
II. In accordance with Special Field Orders, No. 272, current series, from these headquarters, Brig. Gen. R. W. Johnson, commanding First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, is hereby detailed as general officer of the day for to-morrow, November 24, 1863. He will report at these headquarters at 8 a.m. to-morrow for instructions.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
By command of Major-General Thomas:
 WILLIAM McMICHAEL, Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, November 24, 1863--12.30 a.m.
 Major-General HOOKER,
Lookout Valley:
Intercepted rebel dispatch is to the effect that rebels expect us to attack them on their left in the morning. General commanding desires that you make demonstrations early as possible after daybreak on point of Lookout Mountain. General Grant still hopes Woods division will get across to join Sherman, in which case your demonstration will aid Sherman's crossing. If Woods can't cross you can take the point of Lookout if your demonstration develops its practicability.
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, Chief of Staff.
-----
HOOKER'S HEADQUARTERS, November 24, 1863--2 a.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff:
I am just informed that Woods' division will not be able to cross the river for twelve hours, and in consequence have given directions <ar55_107> for it to take position for an advance on Lookout Nose, to be there at sunrise. That there may be no mistake as to the crossing, I will send a staff officer to ascertain positively.
 HOOKER, Major-General.
-----
LOOKOUT VALLEY, November 24, 1863--3.15 a.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff, Chattanooga:
I now have information that the bridge will not be completed today, and I have made preparations accordingly. I will make my demonstrations as soon after daylight as practicable.
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
LOOKOUT VALLEY, November 24, 1863--7.30 a.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS:
My troops are all in position, but in consequence of the swollen state of the creek the crossing will be delayed an hour or so.
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
LOOKOUT VALLEY, November 24, 1863--8 a.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS:
I have sent Geary, supported by Whitaker, to cross the creek at Wauhatchie, and work down on the right bank of it.
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
BALD MOUNTAIN SIGNAL STATION, November 24, 1863--8 a.m.
 Captain MERRILL:
One division of infantry is now moving toward our left on Missionary Ridge.
 J. H. CONNELLY, Lieutenant, and Acting Signal Officer.
-----
OPPOSITE SOUTH CHICKAMAUGA, November 24, 1863--11 a.m. (Received 12 m.)
 Captain MERRILL:
Sherman has three divisions across and four guns. Rebels moving heavy force to our left. They have a battery at Tunnel bridge. Bridge laid; steamer ferrying.
 QUINTON, Signal Officer.
 <ar55_108>
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
INSPECTOR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT, Fort Wood, [November] 24, 1863--11 a.m.
 Major-General THOMAS:
GENERAL: The enemy are moving by flank to our left on Missionary Ridge. (Signal from Colonel Barnett's battery, opposite side of river.)
 G. M. L. JOHNSON, Captain, and Acting Assistant Inspector-General.
-----
LOOKOUT VALLEY, November 24, 1863--11 a.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS:
I am in condition to cross the creek, but as it will be attended with some considerable loss, I have deemed it advisable to await the arrival of Geary's command down its right bank before doing so. I think that he will be up as early as 12 o'clock.
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
LOOKOUT VALLEY, November 24, 1863--12.15 p.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS:
The valley is now clear. General Geary's division is on the crest of the slope of Lookout Mountain.
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
BALD MOUNTAIN SIGNAL STATION, November 24, 1863--12.20 p.m.
 Major-General THOMAS:
General Howard's column has formed junction with Sherman.
 C. A. DANA.
-----
SIGNAL STATION OPPOSITE SIDE OF RIVER, November 24, [1863]--12.30 p.m.
 General THOMAS:
Bridge completed.
 DANA.
-----
CAMERON HILL SIGNAL STATION, November 24, [1863.]
(Received 12.30 p.m.)
 Captain MERRILL:
Our forces have carried the works near white house, on Lookout.
 HOWGATE.
 <ar55_109>
FORT WOOD (FROM SIGNAL STATION OPPOSITE SIDE OF THE RIVER), November 24--1 p.m.
 General THOMAS:
Woods is about to cross.
 DANA.
-----
HOOKER'S HEADQUARTERS, November 24, [1863]--1.25 p.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS:
In announcing the fact of our great success this morning I had no time to state its results. The conduct of all the troops has been brilliant, and the success has far exceeded my expectations. Our loss has not been severe, and of prisoners I should judge that we had not less than 2,000. The bulk of my infantry is now assembling on the east side of Lookout Mountain. Of course the routes do not admit of the passage of artillery.
 HOOKER, Major-General.
-----
HDQRS. SECOND BRIG., FIRST DIV., FOURTH ARMY CORPS, White House, Lookout Mountain, Nov. 24, [1863]--2 p.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff:
I have established my headquarters in the white house, on Lookout Mountain. The enemy are massing rapidly on my right. Support me. Have taken two guns.
Respectfully,
 W. C. WHITAKER, Brigadier-General.
-----
HDQRS. SECOND BRIG., FIRST DIV., 4TH ARMY CORPS, White House, on Lookout, November 24, [1863]--2 p.m.
 Lieutenant-Colonel FULLERTON, Chief Of Staff:
I am in possession of the white house, on Lookout Mountain, and if I get ammunition I can hold it. The enemy are massing on my right.
Respectfully,
 W. C. WHITAKER, Brigadier-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS FOURTH ARMY CORPS, Chattanooga, Tenn., November 24, 1863.
CAPTAIN: Can you let General Whitaker have ammunition? We have no ordnance officer, and General Granger is in the front.
Very respectfully,
 J. S. FULLERTON, Lieutenant-Colonel, and Assistant Adjutant-General.
 <ar55_110>
HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, November 24, 1863.
 Major-General HOOKER:
General Thomas has just ordered the Moccasin Point battery to open on the Summertown road. Order sent by courier.
 J. P. WILLARD, Captain, and Aide-de-Camp.
-----
HDQRS. SIGNAL CORPS, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND, November 24, 1863.
 Captain WILLARD, Aide-de-Camp:
CAPTAIN: The order from General Thomas to batteries on Moccasin Point, directing them to open on Summertown road, cannot be sent just now, on account of mist and rain. I will send it as soon as possible, unless otherwise directed.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 JESSE MERRILL, Captain, and Chief Signal Officer.
-----
 Captain MERRILL:
Please send me a copy of the order.
 J. P. W[ILLARD].
-----
 NOVEMBER 24, 1863--2.35 p.m.
 WOOD:
General Thomas directs that the battery on [Moccasin] Point open on the Summertown road immediately.
 MERRILL.
-----
 NOVEMBER 24, 1863. (Received 3.10.)
 Captain LEONARD:
Naylor's and Aleshire's batteries are firing at enemy in line of battle on our right, beyond rolling mills.
 WOOD, Lieutenant, and Signal Officer.
-----
DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, November 24, 1863--3.45 p.m.
 General HOOKER:
Hold position until you can replenish ammunition. Brigade getting across Chattanooga Creek to support you.
By command of Major-General Thomas:
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General.
 <ar55_111>
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, November 24, 1863.
 Major-General HOOKER:
Your success is glorious. Resupply ammunition if possible. We are crossing a brigade to connect with you. Send prisoners to Kelley's Ferry to be guarded. Take accurate list.
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, Chief of Staff:
-----
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN, November 24, 1863--4 p.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS:
It is so dark in Chattanooga Valley that it is impossible for me to see the position of the enemy or his numbers, and I deem it very imprudent to descend into it to-night. I hold the line from the white house to the point where the railroad passes beneath the mountain down the river on the Chattanooga side.
We have smart skirmishing along the line, particularly the upper part of it, but my troops are unflinching, and cannot be driven from their position, which they are strengthening every moment. The enemy continue to hold the top of Lookout Mountain, and I cannot prevent it until I can move around and take possession of the Summertown road, which, as I am informed, requires me to descend into the valley.
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN, November 24, 1863--5.15 p.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS:
General Carlin's brigade has just reported to me. I have sent it to the right of my line, resting on the white house, as this was held by troops exhausted from the labors of to-day. At this point they will be in position to threaten the enemy's rear, if he does not retire before morning.
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN, November 24, 1863--6.40 p.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS:
I am all right for to-night. In the morning I shall be short of batteries, though I hope to have the road and the bridges in condition to enable me to bring forward some of mine by the time I shall require them. The enemy had felled trees across the Chattanooga road over the mountain, and a slide in the road made it necessary to expend a good deal of labor upon it. From the dense fog to-day I have not been able to learn much of the topography of Chattanooga Valley in my front. For this reason I suggest that the operations <ar55_112> of to-morrow be suspended until the fog lifts, if it should not require too much detention. I request that General Smith will forward me the map of which he spoke a day or two since.
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, November 24, 1863--9.30 p.m.
 Major-General HOOKER, Lookout Valley:
The general commanding the department congratulates you most heartily upon your glorious success to-day, and desires that you convey his warmest thanks to the troops under your command for their valorous conduct. General Grant has just directed that General Sherman move along Missionary Ridge to-morrow with his force, while our force advances to the front, co-operating with Sherman and compelling the enemy to show whether he occupies his rifle-pits in our front. Be in readiness to advance as early as possible in the morning into Chattanooga Valley and seize and hold the Summertown road and co-operate with the Fourteenth Corps by supporting its right. Map sent by courier at 8 o'clock this evening.
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, Chief of Staff.
-----
SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS No. 315.
HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, Tenn., Nov. 24, 1863.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
II. In accordance with Special Field Orders, No. 272, current series, from these headquarters, Maj. Gen. P. H. Sheridan, commanding Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, is hereby detailed as general officer of the day for to-morrow, November 25, 1863. He will report at these headquarters at 8 a.m. to-morrow for instructions.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
By command of Major-General Thomas:
 WILLIAM McMICHAEL, Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS THIRD BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION, November 25, [1863. ]
 General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff:
I had the flag of our country unfurled on Lookout's bold front at sunrise this morning, and have possession of the point. Have skirmished it for a mile on top. Saw only 6 rebels.
Respectfully,
 W. C. WHITAKER, Brigadier-General.
 <ar55_113>
HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH CORPS, White House, Lookout Mountain, November 25, 1863.
 Major-General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff, Chattanooga:
I have the honor to report that we have possession of the peak of Lookout Mountain. Present indications point to the enemy's having abandoned our front; prisoners think they have abandoned the valley entirely. Have ordered a reconnaissance to get some information, and will know more presently.
Very respectfully,
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
NOVEMBER 25, [1863]--7 a.m.
 Major-General HOOKER:
The general commanding desires that you immediately move forward, in accordance with instructions of last evening.
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, and Chief of Staff.
-----
 [Captain WILLARD,
Aide-de-Camp:]
CAPTAIN: We have no communication with General Hooker. The two officers were ordered to join General Hooker on the mountain, and are on their way there now. Will have communication very soon, I think. I will send message as soon as open.
Respectfully, JESSE MERRILL.
-----
WHITE HOUSE, LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN, November 25, 1863--8.15 a.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS:
Column of troops passing along Mission Ridge to our left; been moving for some little time.
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, November 25, 1863--8.45 a.m.
(Received 9.45 a.m.)
 Major-General HOWARD:
The general commanding department directs that you move your force toward General Sherman's, looking well to your right flank «8 R R--VOL XXXI, PT II» <ar55_114> and in readiness to form line on your right in case you should be attacked on the march.
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, and Chief of Staff.
-----
HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH CORPS, White House, Lookout Mountain, November 25, 1863.
 Major-General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff, Chattanooga:
Upon the clearing up of the fog, since dispatch at sunrise, we can see the enemy's camps over on the slope of Missionary Ridge and in the valley near there. Our glasses are not strong enough to detect how thickly they are filled. I failed to inform you yesterday that we captured two pieces of artillery and about two thousand stand of small-arms; the latter are scattered over the whole field of yesterday.
Very respectfully,
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
SIGNAL STATION OPPOSITE SOUTH CHICKAMAUGA, November 25, 1863--9 a.m.
 Captain MERRILL:
One division infantry is now moving toward our left on Missionary Ridge.
 CONNELLY, Signal Officer.
[Indorsement.]
Communication has just been opened with Lookout, and message to General Hooker sent.
 MERRILL.
-----
ORCHARD KNOB, November 25, 1863--9 a.m.
 COMMANDING OFFICER,
Fort Wood:
Do not fire any more from Fort Wood, except an occasional shot into the enemy's rifle-pits on their extreme right, and on top of the ridge, when the enemy show themselves in force.
 GEO. H. THOMAS, Major-General.
-----
WHITE HOUSE, LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN, November 25, 1863--9.20 a.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS:
Have regiment on Summertown road; one on summit of Lookout. Enemy reported picketing Chattanooga Creek. They appear to be burning camps in valley. I await orders.
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
 <ar55_115>
DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, November 25, 1863--10.10 a.m.
 Major-General HOOKER:
Leave Carlin's brigade at Summertown road, to rejoin Palmer. Move with the remainder of your force, except two regiments to hold Lookout Mountain, on the Rossville road toward Missionary Ridge, looking well to your right flank.
By order Major-General Thomas:
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General.
-----
ORCHARD KNOB, November 25, 1863--10.30 a.m.
 COMMANDING OFFICER,
Fort Wood:
The enemy is in force in farther edge of woods below their camp to left of Orchard Knob. Put a few shells in there.
 GEO. H. THOMAS, Major-General.
-----
ORCHARD KNOB, November 25, 1863--10.45 a.m.
 Battery North Side of River:
Your elevation is too small. Shells fall just in front of our troops. Fire at enemy's camp and top of ridge.
 GEO. H. THOMAS, Major-General.
-----
MOCCASIN POINT SIGNAL STATION, November 25, [1863]--10.45 a.m.
 [Captain LEONARD :]
CAPTAIN: Fifty degrees east of south, and about 2 miles distant, heavy column of rebels moving toward Missionary Ridge.
 WOOD, Signal Officer.
-----
ORCHARD KNOB, November 25, 1863--11 a.m.
 COMMANDING OFFICER,
Fort Wood:
You are firing in the wrong direction. Fire near the tunnel north of Orchard Knob.
 GEO. H. THOMAS, Major-General.
 <ar55_116>
 NOVEMBER 25, 1863--12 m.
 Major-General HOOKER:
I wish you and General Palmer to move forward firmly and steadily upon the enemy's works in front of Missionary Ridge, using General Sheridan as a pivot.
 GEO. H. THOMAS, Major-General.
-----
NEAR CHATTANOOGA CREEK, TENN., November 25, 1863--1.25 p.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff, Chattanooga:
I have been delayed preparing crossing at Chattanooga Creek. Bridges are destroyed. Shall be stopped perhaps an hour. The advance are skirmishing with the enemy across the creek, probably rear guard.
The bearer will return with any dispatches.
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
MISSIONARY RIDGE, November 25, 1863--1.35 p.m.
 General REYNOLDS:
Have you seen General Hooker? Failed to find him. Established no headquarters. Reported gone to Chattanooga. His forces gone to Carlin's brigade on ridge. Granger, Sheridan, and Hazen at Bragg's headquarters.
 JOHNSON, Captain, and Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
MISSIONARY RIDGE, November 25, 1863--6 p.m.
 General THOMAS:
I think we have them, but I want a battery.
Respectfully,
GRANGER, General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS FOURTH ARMY CORPS, BRAGG'S VACATED HEADQUARTERS,
Missionary Ridge, November 25, 1863--7.15 p.m.
 Major-General THOMAS, Commanding Department of the Cumberland:
GENERAL: It is probable that we can cut off a large number of the enemy by making a bold dash upon the Chickamauga, either <ar55_117> upon the Rossville road or the one to the north of it, or upon all of the roads leading from our present front to the Chickamauga. The enemy are evidently badly demoralized. Our men are in great courage and in spirits. I am ready for any orders or dispositions you may be pleased to make.
We have captured about forty pieces of artillery and about 2,000 prisoners, small-arms, &c., in proportion, besides 50 wagon loads of forage.
 G. GRANGER, Major-General, Commanding.
P. S.--The enemy's loss in killed, wounded, and prisoners is very heavy.
-----
DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS,
Chattanooga, November 25, 1863--12 m.
 Major-General GRANGER, Missionary Ridge:
Your dispatch of 7.15 p.m. was duly received. Please accept my hearty congratulations on the splendid success of your troops, and convey to them my cordial thanks for the brilliant style in which they carried the enemy's works. Their conduct cannot be too highly appreciated. I have just seen General Grant, who desires that you make preparations to move up the river as soon as possible.
 GEO. H. THOMAS, Major-General, U.S. Vols., Commanding.
[Indorsement.]
This message was sent to Missionary Ridge, but as messages came from there, I concluded he is in town.
 SHERIDAN, U.S. Army.
-----
SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS No. 316.
HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, Tenn., Nov. 25, 1863.
I. In accordance with Special Field Orders, No. 272, current series, from these headquarters, Brig. Gen. A. Baird, commanding Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, is hereby detailed as general officer of the day for to-morrow, November 26, 1863. He will report at these headquarters at 8 a.m. to-morrow for instructions.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
By command of Major-General Thomas:
 WILLIAM McMICHAEL, Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
GENERAL ORDERS No. 7.
HDQRS. ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH CORPS, Lookout Mountain, Tenn., Nov. 25, 1863.
The splendid achievements of the troops engaged in the assault and capture of Lookout Mountain have elicited from the general commanding the department his warmest congratulations, and it is <ar55_118> with the highest satisfaction they are communicated to the command. The triumphs of yesterday, the successive gallant charges up the mountain side over the enemy's intrenchment, with the successful results, will be remembered as long as the giant peak of Lookout shall be their mute but eloquent monument. No words of the major-general commanding can express his admiration for the conduct and valor displayed during the operations of yesterday by the troops engaged, including the First Division of the Fourth Corps; the First Division, Fifteenth Corps; the First Brigade, First Division, Fourteenth Corps, and the Second Division, Twelfth Corps.
The following extract from a telegram received is promulgated in compliance with orders:
CHATTANOOGA, TENN., November 24, 1863.
Major-General HOOKER:
The general commanding the department congratulates you most heartily upon your glorious success to-day, and desires that you convey his warmest thanks to the troops under your command for their valorous conduct.
J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, Chief of Staff.
By command of Major-General Hooker:
 DANL. BUTTERFIELD, Major-General, Chief of Staff.
-----
HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH CORPS, November 26, 1863--10 a.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS:
From the best information I have been able to obtain from the reconnaissance of my own command and from those of others, and after giving the subject my best reflection, I am already of the opinion that my column should move to Graysville via Rossville. In suggesting this, it is with the impression that the entire force of the enemy is falling back with all possible rapidity. If I am not prevented from making this movement rapidly, I think there is good reason to suppose that a portion of the enemy’s retreating column may be intercepted. The general can judge whether or not my column should be supported by that of General Palmer. Permit me to suggest that the troops of General Sheridan, now at Mission Mills, be instructed to destroy the railroad bridge across Chickamauga River.
 HOOKER, Major-general.
-----
ROSSVILLE, November 26, 1863--11 a.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS:
Colonel Simmons, instead of sending the rations, sends a note to me, ordering me to direct the commissary of Eleventh and Twelfth Corps to apply at Chattanooga for commissary stores, and returns the guide sent down to conduct the train. Perhaps you can comprehend this; I cannot. We shall rely upon your having some one execute your orders to place 20,000 rations and forage at Rossville as soon as possible. The guide will show them out.
Very respectfully,
DANL. BUTTERFIELD.
 <ar55_119>
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, November 26, 1863--1 p.m.
 Major-General HOOKER:
General Thomas approves your suggestions, and directs that you push on to Graysville. General Palmer is ordered to report to you and support you.
Very respectfully,
 J. J. R[EYNOLDS].
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, November 26, 1863--1 p.m.
 Major-General PALMER:
You will report to General Hooker, and co-operate with him in his movement on Graysville. You will move with Baird's division and Johnson's, except the brigade in the fort.
By command of General Thomas:
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, Chief of Staff.
-----
 NOVEMBER 26, 1863--1.45 p.m.
 General GRANGER:
The general commanding directs me to say to you that it is General Grant's order that you complete your preparations for the Knoxville expedition as soon as possible.
 WM. D. WHIPPLE, Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH CORPS, Near Pea Vine Creek, Ga., November 26, 1863---10 p.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff, Chattanooga:
We have reached a ridge said to be 2 ½ miles from Ringgold. General Palmer led the column, and captured three pieces of artillery complete near the ridge, where we now are, where we struck the rear of enemy's column. His (Pallher's) advance is at Graysville. We are informed that it was the rear of Hardee's command, composing the Left Wing of Bragg's army. If not otherwise directed, I shall move on Ringgold at daylight. Subsequent movements will depend upon what I learn there.
Very respectfully,
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS, Graysville, November 27, 1863--6.30 a.m.
 General JOSEPH J. REYNOLDS:
With Johnson's division last night surprised General Stewart, took three guns (Napoleon), two caissons, and many prisoners. Surprise complete. I send prisoners and artillery in this morning. Here we took an additional gun.
 J. M. PALMER, Major-General,
 <ar55_120>
RINGGOLD, GA., November 27, 1863--9 a.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS,  Chattanooga:
Our column has arrived at this point. Some skirmishing now in front in the gap through which the railroad passes to Dalton. We had skirmishing (light) along the road this morning, and picked up some prisoners. The town is pretty much cleaned out. The road was strewn with caissons, limbers, ambulances, &c.; every evidence that the retreat is precipitate and disorderly. Our provisions have not arrived, and as the men have been without food for twenty-four hours I shall be compelled to return for supplies.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General.
-----
RINGGOLD, GA., November 27, 1863--10.45 a.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS,  Chief of Staff, Chattanooga:
GENERAL: In compliance with the instructions sent direct to General Palmer, I have directed him to return to Chattanooga with his command. I send with him about 200 prisoners, in addition to those sent in yesterday and last evening.
I inclose herewith copy of a letter(*) captured here, written by staff officer of General Hardee's to his wife, as it will inform the general of rebel views of our recent operations.
Of the rations forwarded yesterday there was a great deal of flour, which cannot be used in consequence of the absence of means to make bread.
The general will observe, from my instructions from General Grant (copy forwarded last evening), that I am not permitted to advance unless I do so without fighting a battle. This puts me in the condition of the boy who was permitted to learn to swim provided he would not go near the water. I have information, which I deem reliable, that the enemy are preparing defenses to make a determined resistance at Tunnel Hill.
Under orders of General Grant, I have destroyed the bridge and 2 miles of railroad yesterday, and am prepared to burn the depots, mills, and tanneries before my departure.
Under my present orders, I am required to remain here until the 30th. I request orders for my movements after that time.
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
RINGGOLD, GA., November 27, 1863--11.30 a.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS,  Chattanooga:
The enemy makes a stand determinedly in the position where the railroad passes through the gap here. I have not yet been able to drive him from it or to turn it. There is still skirmishing going on, but I have given directions for the firing to cease.
My artillery has but now arrived. I shall try the effect of that as soon as it can be got in position. None of Palmer's has been engaged. <ar55_121> About one-half of my original command (Osterhaus' and one-third of Geary's) have been engaged. My loss has been quite heavy. I shall not persist in the attack unless it is to my advantage.
Very respectfully,
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General.
-----
RINGGOLD, GA., November 27, 1863--12.45 p.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS,  Chattanooga:
GENERAL: The enemy have been forced to abandon the position he held on the ridge reported in my last.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 JOSEPH HOOKER,  Major-General.
-----
RINGGOLD, GA., November 27, 1863--3 p.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS,  Chattanooga:
GENERAL: By direction of General Grant, I have sent a brigade in the direction of Tunnel Hill. This force is sent not so much to fight as for making captures of trains reported stalled and to convey the impression of pursuit of the enemy.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH CORPS, Ringgold, Ga., November 27, 1863--4 p.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff, Chattanooga:
The summary of operations to-day thus far is: Our march here, driving the enemy from his camp on Chickamauga and here, and finally driving him from his position in the gap, heretofore reported. Our captures will be probably 150 or 200 prisoners; the number cannot be accurately given, as they were sent to the rear in different parties from different commands; a store-house at the depot, with a large quantity of forage; four or five caissons, partially filled with ammunition. General Palmer captured another piece of artillery at Graysville, making four in all since we left Rossville, coming this way. Nothing yet from the brigade sent toward Tunnel Hill.
Very respectfully,
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-general, Commanding.
-----
RINGGOLD, GA., November 27, 1863.
 Major-General REYNOLDS,  Chattanooga:
I have not been able heretofore to send a memorandum of the operations of the 25th on Missionary Ridge.
As soon as the bridge over Chattanooga Creek could be completed we advanced along the ridge in three columns, capturing one piece <ar55_122> of artillery and several hundred prisoners from Stewart's division, opposing us. The balance of the enemy that maintained any organization were driven in and captured by General Johnson's division. We captured a large quantity of flour at Rossville, 50 or 60 boxes artillery ammunition, large quantities of small-arms, among them many new ones in boxes unopened. Our loss in killed and wounded was slight, and did not compare with that inflicted upon the enemy.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General.
-----
RINGGOLD, GA., November 27, 1863--6 p.m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS,
Chattanooga :
I cannot leave here until my wounded are all removed. If the ambulances sent for arrive, I shall probably be able to get them off to-morrow. General Palmer's command might be withdrawn from here.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General.
-----
HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH CORPS, Ringgold, Ga., November 28, 1863--12 m.
 Major-General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff, Chattanooga:
Two musicians, deserters from the enemy, came in this morning. They state that Bragg's army was pretty fairly concentrated at Tunnel Hill, about 8 miles from here, the object being to cover their trains, baggage, &c. Their pickets were this side, within 3 or 4 miles from here. They thought no stand would be made this side of Atlanta. They state that the woods and ravines are full of deserters who were determined to leave the enemy now, but did not like to come into our lines, and would try to get into Kentucky and Tennessee (their homes) around our lines. The musicians were from a Kentucky regiment, and brought in their instruments with them. We have taken 70 barrels of flour, which is ordered to Chattanooga, to be delivered to the chief commissary.
Our exact casualties, as reported, of yesterday, are:
Command Killed. Wounded. Missing. Total
General.Geary 22 179 4 205
General.Osterhaus 43 245 16 304
Total  65 424 20 (a)509

Very respectfully,
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
 <ar55_123>
RINGGOLD, GA., November 28, 1863.
  Major-General REYNOLDS,  Chattanooga:
GENERAL: Under the orders I now have (but just received from General Grant), I shall need 50,000 rations, to be sent out as soon as possible.
From information I have that the enemy are re-enforcing their troops at Tunnel Hill, said to be from Johnston's command, I have taken the liberty of retaining General Palmer's command until I can satisfy myself with regard to the accuracy of the report.
I inclose copy of General Grant's order.(*)
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
P. S.--Of the order to General Palmer I only learned by chance. I have to request that all orders affecting my command may be sent through me.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, November 29, 1863--4 p.m.
 Major-General PALMER:
The general commanding department directs that your troops resume their camps at Chattanooga. You will throw out a proper picket on our old front line. Starkweather's brigade has just started on an expedition on the top of Lookout Mountain.
Very respectfully,
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, Chief of Staff.
From railroad crossing on Citico Creek to the Chimneys on Chattanooga Creek.
-----
HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH CORPS, Ringgold, Ga., November 30, 1863.
 Major-General REYNOLDS, Chief of Staff, Chattanooga :
Two contrabands, just arrived from Dalton, report the main force of the enemy gone beyond Dalton, about 300 men at Tunnel Hill, and the enemy's cavalry this side. The rations requested to be sent out yesterday morning have not arrived. I am without provisions for one brigade, and shall be compelled to return for them. The non-arrival of the train will, I now fear, compel me to leave some machinery, which I hoped to take back with me in the emptied wagons.
Very respectfully, &c.,
 JOSEPH HOOKER, Major-General, Commanding.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, November 30, 1863--9 a.m.
 Maj. Gen. JOSEPH HOOKER:
GENERAL: The general commanding department directs that you leave Ringgold with the forces under your command, starting <ar55_124> shortly after the moon rises to-night, and move toward Chattanooga.
The troops of the Twelfth Corps and those of the Fourth Corps will resume their original positions west of Lookout Mountain and on the road to Bridgeport.
Osterhaus' division will be halted at a convenient point between Chattanooga and Rossville, and the commanding officer will report to General Grant for instructions. Execute the orders received from General Grant in reference to the destruction of property at Ringgold. It is reported, on what seems good authority, that some of our dead lie unburied on the battle-field of Chickamauga. Order a detail from the command of General Cruft, or the whole command if necessary, to return via Chickamauga and bury them.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, and Chief of Staff.
-----
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, January 15, 1864.
GENERAL: I have the honor to report the operations of my command from December 1 to 31, 1863, as follows:
December 1, General Hooker returned to Chattanooga from Ringgold with Geary's division, of the Twelfth Corps, and Osterhaus' division, of the Fifteenth Corps. Cruft's two brigades, of the First Division, Fourth Corps, were ordered to proceed to Chickamauga battle-field and bury such of our dead as still remained unburied by the rebels. This duty finished, they were to return to their former positions on the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, between Whiteside's and Bridgeport. General Hooker, on evacuating Ringgold, destroyed the railroad depot and other buildings, as well as such captured property as could not be removed. General Granger's corps marched to the relief of Knoxville, acting in connection with General Sherman's command, which was also moving toward that place. Third Brigade, First Division of Cavalry, Colonel Watkins, of the Sixth Kentucky, commanding, was stationed at Rossville, with an infantry support of two regiments, to guard our south front. General Elliott, with the First Cavalry Division, was ordered to proceed from his position, in the vicinity of Sparta, to Kingston, East Tennessee. He received later instructions, to the effect that in case he did not reach that place in time to participate in the pursuit of Longstreet, he was to establish his headquarters at Athens, and throw out posts as far as possible to the southeast to observe the movements of the enemy in that direction.
Information given by deserters from the enemy places the rebel army in our front as follows: Cleburne's division is at Tunnel Hill, and the balance of the army is stationed between there and Dalton. They state that the troops are very much demoralized, the men being very much scattered from their regiments, and desertions are numerous. Buckner's corps was not in the battles in front of Chattanooga, it having gone to the assistance of Longstreet seven or eight days previous.
December 3, Col. George P. Buell, Fifty-eighth Indiana Volunteers, commanding Pioneer Brigade, commenced constructing a double-track wagon road over the nose of Lookout Mountain.
December 13, General Gillem reports from Nashville that he had <ar55_125> just returned to that place from the Tennessee River. The work on the Northwestern railroad was progressing. Guerrillas between the Cumberland and Duck Rivers broken up. Perkins and Ray were disposed of, the former having been killed and the latter captured. Refugees and conscripts from the south side of the river report that Forrest and Pillow are at Jackson, West Tennessee, with about 4,000 men, 1,000 of whom are well mounted and organized.
December 15, a small party of rebels, under Maj. Joe Fontaine, Roddey's adjutant, was captured by General Dodge near Pulaski. They had been on a reconnaissance along the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad and the Nashville and Decatur Railroad. Measures were immediately taken to guard against an attack on either railroad.
On the 17th, Howard's corps returned to Chattanooga from Knoxville; also Davis' division, of the Fourteenth Corps. The latter was posted along Spring Creek, south of Missionary Ridge, and the former returned to its position in Lookout Valley.
Through scouts we learn that the enemy is strengthening his position between Tunnel Hill and Dalton; also at Resaca, near the Coosa River, and at Allatoona Mountains, the last named place being a formidable position. Information from various sources leads to the belief that Hardee is making the Oostenaula River his front, defended by rifle-pits and fortifications; also the Etowah River. All deserters and scouts agree in their statements that the rebels in our front are disheartened and demoralized. President Lincoln's amnesty proclamation was having a good effect in encouraging desertions, and movements have been taken to circulate it quite extensively within the enemy's lines. The cavalry command, under General Elliott, having been detained by General Foster for duty in his department, Col. Eli Long, Fourth Ohio Cavalry, commanding Second Brigade, Second Division Cavalry, was stationed at Calhoun, on the Hiwassee River, for the purpose of watching the movements of the enemy in that vicinity. The balance of the Second Division, under command of General Crook, was ordered by General Grant, on the 20th, to move from Huntsville, where it then was, to Prospect, with a view to operate against Forrest. General W. S. Smith, chief of cavalry of the Military Division of the Mississippi, with the Third, Fifth, and Seventh Kentucky, Second and Fourth Tennessee, and Eighth Iowa Cavalry Regiments, started for Savannah on the 20th, to cross the Tennessee, and operate on the flank and rear of Forrest and drive him from West Tennessee. The operations of the cavalry have been quite brilliant during the month. Col. L. D. Watkins, commanding Third Brigade, First Division, from his position at Rossville: has made several successful raids into the enemy's lines. On the 5th, a reconnaissance sent by him proceeded as far as Ringgold without finding any signs of the enemy, except stragglers and deserters. Again on the 14th, with detachments of the Fourth and Sixth Kentucky Cavalry, numbering about 250 men, he made a reconnaissance toward La Fayette, surprised that town, capturing a colonel of the Georgia Home Guards, 6 officers of the rebel signal corps, and about 38 horses and mules; our loss, none. On the 23d he sent out a scout of 150 men from Fourth and Sixth Kentucky Regiments, under command of Major Welling, of the Fourth Kentucky, which proceeded as far as La Fayette, capturing at that place 1 commissioned officer, 16 non-commissioned and privates. 10 citizens (said to be violent rebels), and 38 horses and mules. <ar55_126>
On the 22d, a party of Wheeler's cavalry, numbering about 75 men, attacked a small party of the Fourth Michigan Cavalry, stationed at Cleveland. Our loss was 1 or 2 captured, some property lost, consisting of overcoats, saddles, &c., but the enemy were finally driven off.
On the 23d, Geary's division, of the Twelfth Corps, left their camp at Lookout Valley to take up a position along the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, one brigade to be stationed at Bridgeport and the other at Stevenson.
On the 28th, Colonel Bernard Laiboldt, Second Missouri Infantry, in charge of a train and escort, principally of convalescents belonging to the Fourth Corps, proceeding from Chattanooga to Knoxville, was attacked by a force of Wheeler's cavalry, numbering between 1,200 and 1,500, as he was crossing the Hiwassee River at Charleston. He immediately formed his guard in line of battle on the south side of the river, succeeded in crossing all his train in safety, and then charged the astonished rebels and drove them in confusion. He then called upon Col. Eli Long for cavalry co-operation, who sent all the force he then had in camp, numbering 150 men. With this small force Colonel Long charged the enemy with sabers and drove him 5 miles, capturing 130 prisoners, including 5 commissioned officers. Our loss was 2 killed and 15 wounded. The enemy left his dead and wounded, as well as quite a number of small-arms, &c., upon the field. Both Colonels Laiboldt and Long are entitled to great credit for the manner in which they repelled this attack. I earnestly recommend them to favorable consideration for promotion; Colonel Laiboldt, for his executive ability and efficiency as a brigade commander of the Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps; Col. Eli Long, for the valuable service he rendered during the recent battles in front of Chattanooga and for many instances of previous good conduct.
Provost-Marshal-General Wiles reports that 1,080 deserters from the enemy have come into the lines of this army between the 19th of October and December 31.
Twenty regiments had reorganized as veteran volunteers on the 1st of January, 1864, as follows:

Command Brigade Division Army Corps
29th Pennsylvania Infantry  2 2 12
28th Pennsylvania Infantry  1 2 12
111th Pennsylvania Infantry  2 2 12
147th Pennsylvania Infantry  1 2 12
26th Battery, Pennsylvania Artillery 1 3 4
66th Ohio Infantry  1 2 12
29th Ohio Infantry  1 2 12
14th Ohio Infantry  3 3 14
38th Ohio Infantry  3 3 14
6th Ohio Light Battery  2 3 4
17th Ohio Infantry  1 3 14
3d Wisconsin Infantry  3 1 12
35th Indiana Infantry  2 1 4
9th Indiana Infantry  3 1 4
29th Indiana Infantry  1 1 4
38th Indiana Infantry  1 1 14
60th New York Infantry  3 2 12
78th New York Infantry  3 2 12
102 New York Infantry  3 2 12
9th Michigan Infantry (a)   14
16th Illinois Infantry  1 2 14

 <ar55_127>
The above regiments had left their divisions on the 1st of January, 1864; a great many others were preparing to reorganize as veterans.
I have the honor to annex hereto(*) the official report of the operations of the Second Brigade, Second Division Cavalry, Col. Eli Long, Fourth Ohio Cavalry, commanding; also that of Col. Bernard Laiboldt, Second Missouri, concerning the repulse of Wheeler's cavalry at Charleston, and copies of the official reports of the cavalry force under General Elliott at the engagement at Mossy Creek, E. Tenn.
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 GEO. H. THOMAS, Major-General, U.S. Vols., Commanding.
 Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General U.S. Army.


HOME
Archive
Photos
Facts
News
Chronology AotC
Battles & Reports
Overview
Links