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Reports of the battle for Chattanooga 23-25 Nov. 63

1. George H. Thomas
2. Ulysses S. Grant
3. Joseph Hooker
4. William T. Sherman
5. Peter J. Osterhaus
6. August Willich
7. Henry W. Halleck
------------
8. Braxton Bragg
9. Patrick R. Cleburne
10. Alexander P. Stewart  ?



7. Henry W. Halleck
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXI/2 [S# 55] NOVEMBER 23-27, 1863.--The Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign.
No. 1.--Reports of Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck, General-in-Chief U.S. Army.

<ar55_11>
HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
Washington, D.C., November 15, 1863.
SIR: In compliance with your orders, I submit the following summary of military operations since my last annual report:
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Major-General Grant arrived at Louisville, and on the 19th [of October, 1863], in obedience to the orders of the President, assumed general command of the Departments of the Tennessee, Cumberland, and Ohio. In accordance with his recommendation, Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas was placed in the immediate command of the Department of the Cumberland, and Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman of that of the Tennessee.
As the supply of the army at Chattanooga demanded prompt attention he immediately repaired to that place. By bringing up from Bridgeport the Eleventh and Twelfth Army Corps, under General Hooker, and throwing a force front Chattanooga, under General W. F. Smith, on the south side of the river at Brown's Ferry, the points of Lookout Mountain commanding the river were recaptured on the 27th, 28th, and 29th of October. This important success restored his communication with his depots of supplies.
*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *
All of which is respectfully submitted.
 H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief.
 Hon. E. M. STANTON,  Secretary of War.
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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
Washington, December 6, 1863.
SIR: In compliance with your instructions, I submit the following summary of the operations of General Grant's army since my report of the 15th ultimo:
It appears, from the official reports which have been received here, that our loss in the operations of the 27th, 28th, and 29th of October, in reopening communications on the south side of the Tennessee River from Chattanooga to Bridgeport, was 76 killed, 339 wounded, and 22 missing; total, 437. The estimated loss of the enemy was over 1,500. As soon as General Grant could get up his supplies, he prepared to advance upon the enemy, who had become weakened by the detachment of Longstreet's command against Knoxville.
General Sherman's army moved up the north side of the Tennessee River, and during the night of the 23d and 24th of November established pontoon bridges, and crossed to the south side between Citico Creek and the Chickamauga. On the afternoon of the 23d, General Thomas' forces attacked the enemy's rifle-pits between Chattanooga and Citico Creek. The battle was renewed on the 24th along the whole line; Sherman carried the eastern end of Missionary Ridge up to the tunnel, and Thomas repelled every attempt of the enemy to regain the position which he had lost at the center, while Hooker's force in Lookout Valley crossed the mountain and drove the enemy from its northern slope. <ar55_12>
On the 25th, the whole of Missionary Ridge from Rossville to the Chickamauga was, after a desperate struggle, most gallantly carried by our troops, and the enemy completely routed. Considering the strength of the rebel position and the difficulty of storming his intrenchments, the battle of Chattanooga must be regarded as one of the most remarkable in history. Not only did the officers and men exhibit great skill and daring in their operations on the field, but the highest praise is also due to the commanding general for his admirable dispositions for dislodging the enemy from a position apparently impregnable. Moreover, by turning his right flank and throwing him back upon Ringgold and Dalton, Sherman's forces were interposed between Bragg and Longstreet, so as to prevent any possibility of their forming a junction.
Our loss in killed, wounded, and missing is reported at about 4,000. We captured over 6,000 prisoners, besides the wounded left in our hands, 42 pieces of artillery, 5,000 or 6,000 small-arms, and a large train. The enemy's loss in killed and wounded is not known.
While Generals Thomas and Hooker pushed Bragg's army back into Georgia, General Sherman with his own and General Granger's forces was sent into East Tennessee to prevent the return of Longstreet and to relieve General Burnside, who was then besieged in Knoxville. We have reliable information that Sherman has successfully accomplished his object, and that Longstreet is in full retreat toward Virginia; but no details have been received in regard to Sherman's operations since he crossed the Hiwassee, nor of Burnside's defense of Knoxville. It is only known that every attack of the enemy on that place was successfully repulsed.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
 H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief.
 Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.


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